UN17 Village: the ecological village built with recycled concrete

The dream of millions of ecology activists will come true: Copenhagen will build UN17 village, an ecological village of 35,000 square meters with recycled concrete, wood, and glass. UN17 Village, will be a housing complex offering 400 new homes in Ørestad South, a district located at the south of the capital of Denmark.

Designed by the Architecture Studios Lendager Group and Årstiderne Arkitekter, the proposal aims to create “the first ecological construction project in the world.” The project based on the Sustainable Development Goals  (SDG) of the UN has an additional element by means of a very particular approach regarding the use of resources and the creation of health-oriented social communities.

Ecological buildings, self-sustaining life

The proposal of the team composed by Lendager Group and Årstiderne Arkitekter defeated the proposals made by renowned studios such as BIG and Henning Larsen, in a competition led by the property developer NREP.

The vision of architect Anders Lendager is for UN17 Village to be more than a group of iconic buildings made from recycled materials. The founder and CEO of the Lendager Group -a company specialized in sustainable, neutral-cost buildings, specifically focused on circular economy- expects that this ecological village will become an opportunity to promote a sustainable lifestyle.

UN17 Village will be formed by five blocks of homes built with recycled concrete and wood, as well as recycled windows. The structures will rely exclusively on sustainable energy.

Each building will have a rooftop garden to promote biodiversity. Also, each one of them will have rainwater collection facilities capable of recycling 1.5 million liters of water each year.

Everything well thought out

 There will be 37 types of houses at UN17 Village. A mix of family homes, living spaces, and accommodations for seniors. The goal is to provide homes to 800 people and generate 100 employment opportunities.

The complex will allocate 3,000 square meters to community areas to be used by both residents and the people of Ørestad. According to Lendager, these spaces will help reduce inequality and create a diverse and strong neighborhood, where people can live regardless of their family structure and age.

This villa, as it has been called, will also have facilities like a conference center to organize events focused on sustainability, an organic restaurant, greenhouses, and food-sharing facilities to encourage people to cultivate their own food and reduce waste. Other public facilities available at the UN17 Village will include a community kitchen, workspaces, guest accommodations, and a community laundromat powered by recycled rainwater.

The team of architects in charge of the design of the UN17 Village have also considered providing the complex with a healthy interior climate. For that purpose, the interior of the houses will be finished with non-toxic and certified materials. At the same time, they will have solar panels on the rooftops to cover their energy needs. And, as expected, this village designed around the concept of ecological architecture will have plenty of green areas and gardens.

2019-01-16T18:40:37-05:00January 17th, 2019|Design and Trends, Innovation|
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